VIWIFF 2017 Festival Highlight: A Revolution in Four Seasons

By Emily Bignell
Tunisia/USA

A Revolution in Four Seasons - 2

This inspirational film traces the struggle for democracy, activism, and self-sacrifice for the sake of revolution.

For those who don’t know,  The Arab Spring was a revolutionary wave of both violent and nonviolent protests, riots, coups and civil wars beginning with the Tunisian revolution. A major slogan of the demonstrators in the Arab world is “the people want to bring down the regime”. Many demonstrations were met with violent retaliations from authorities, as well as from pro-government militias and counter-demonstrators. These attacks were answered back with violence from protesters in some cases, continuing the vicious cycle of conflict.

A Revolution in Four Seasons follows two women with opposing political views as they fight for different versions of an ideal political future in Tunisia. Over the course of Tunisia’s critical post-revolution years, Emna Ben Jemaa, works towards a country governed by free speech and dreams of dismantling corruption of the former regime. In contrast, Jawhara Ettis of the Islamist party Ennahda works towards a Tunisia guided by traditional Islamic principles.

On a public level, both women must navigate how women are treated in their society. Through the journey, they must make difficult choices to balance their public, political roles with marriage and motherhood. As for anyone involved in the political world,  the threat of extremists means that all they are working towards is teetering on the brink of break down and all they’ve worked for could be lost. This timely and insightful documentary traces their paths from public figures in the Arab Spring to opponents in its wake, and the common obstacles they face as outspoken women.

Post Tunisian involvement many large-scale conflicts resulted including the Syrian Civil War. There was an ongoing power struggle after the Tunisian Revolution/Arab Spring. While leadership changed and regimes were dismantled, power then was offered up to another potentially corrupt leader across the Arab world essentially coming down to a contentious battle between the consolidation of power by religious elites, and the growing support for democracy in many Muslim-majority states. As of July 2016, only the uprising in Tunisia resulted in a transition to constitutional democratic governance.

Director Jessie Deeter from California, is a Berkeley Masters graduate in journalism specializing in the Middle East and Africa. After grad Deeter produced stories for Frontline and Al Jazeera, and then moved on to become a Fulbright scholar in Oman, Morocco and Tunisia where she began A Revolution in Four Seasons.

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