Laura Adkin Reflects on Her Experience as a WIFTV Actor Career Mentee

When I was three years old I stood on stage during my pre-school Christmas nativity play (where I played an Angel) and looked out into the crowd – I was hooked. I knew this is what I wanted to do. A lot has happened since then.  

Laura Adkin

Laura Adkin

For the past 15 years, I have been working in the film and television industry, starting out as a wide-eyed actor with really big dreams (not all of those dreams came true). I’ve had major victories and hit major road bumps, but it wasn’t until I discovered mentorship that I realized I didn’t have to go it alone.

Nine years ago, when I was living in LA, I decided to become a member of Women in Film Los Angeles. Through that organization, I participated in a mentorship program with Elaine Hendrix, who helped guide me in the direction I wanted my career to move. It was inspiring and eye opening and had a huge impact on me.

Years later, when I was back in Vancouver, I was desperate for that same sort of mentorship opportunity. Luckily for me, Krista Magnusson, seeing the lack of female actor mentorship in Vancouver, decided to start a program through Women in Film and Television Vancouver. And I was lucky enough to be selected for the inaugural round of the WIFTV Actor Mentorship Program.

My mentor was actress Pascale Hutton. She became an amazing source of information and support, as well as a great sounding board. The program not only gave me the opportunity to have a successful and strong woman to look up to and ask questions, but it also forced me to look at my career in a different way. What did I want? What are my goals? Where do I see myself in five years? The results were career changing to say the least. I had always dabbled in content creating (writing, producing, etc.), but the more I talked with Pascale and the more I did my own soul searching, I realized: not only did I want more than acting – I needed more.

A part of my creative brain wasn’t being accessed and I knew I needed to do something about it. I wrote a short film, which I starred in and produced. I wrote it and produced it within my six- month mentorship program and that set me on a path I never would have imagined. In one of our meetings, Pascale told me I wouldn’t go the typical route of an actor, that my path would be different and I should embrace that. And that’s what I did.  

Since being a WIFTV mentee, I have Directed and written three short films, pitched features to networks, written a pilot, won grants, been accepted into programs, won awards and now even teach at a prestigious acting school. This program was amazing on so many levels and was invaluable to my career. It also showed me the power of mentorship and, like Kevin Spacey said, “If you’ve done well, it’s your obligation to spend a good portion of your time sending the elevator back down.” For the rest of my career I will send the elevator back down and help whoever wants to get on it.

 

Advertisements

Samantha Loney, From Our Dark Side Winner, Dishes about the Highlights (and more) of the 2017 Frontières Market

We asked Samantha Loney some questions about taking her project Married to Murder to the 2017 Frontières International Co-production Market and Networking Platform and here is what she had to say. 

pjimage.jpg

What were your Top 3 Highlights from your time at the Frontières Market? 

1 – Seeing a rough cut scene from George A. Romero’s Road of the Dead!!!

2 – Getting the chance to pitch my project alongside some amazing ladies and be berated in front of an audience by an amazing group of judges. Was a great learning experience.

3 – The Femme Fatales ladies only gathering was amazing. It was a safe space to discuss our period cramps, and how to overthrow the patriarchy. Stay tuned world.

What was one of the lessons learned through the experience?

Grey Nuns Residence is a great place to stay because you’re a block away from all the events at Frontières, but is it worth it when you have to lay awake at night dressed in nothing but your own stank? For lazy people like me yes, but warning to future participants Grey Nuns has no air conditioning.

IMG_0786 (1)

If you had to pick only one, tell us about your favourite moment.

The farewell dinner. After spending four days of talking we got to eat some amazing food, and dance away all the calories from the wine we had consumed all week.

What impact do you feel being at Frontières Market had on your project?

I’ve made quite a few connections, and have been in talks with a director, which I hope works out well so we can take Married to Murder back to Frontières next year to beg for some money on the big stage!

If you would like to learn more about From Our Dark Side, click here.

 

A Look Back at the WIFTV Actor Career Mentorship Program With Michele Povill

With applications currently open for the WIFTV Actor Career Mentorship Program, I contacted actor and former WIFTV Actor Career Mentorship Program Mentee, Michele Povill, to discuss her experience in the program.

submit Michelle PROOF--6-1 (2)

Michele Povil

Michele shared three aspects of the program that stood out to her – the first one being the application process itself. She explained that filling out the application was a great exercise because “it really made me clarify my goals and identify what I wanted from the program.” At the time, Michele was looking to get back into acting after a 35-year break; and expressed, in her application, that she wanted to be paired with an older mentor. Considering that one of Michele’s stated goals was to get an agent, the jury determined that, although Johannah Newmarch was a younger mentor, she would be an excellent match for Michele. Having taken a 10-year hiatus from acting herself, Johanna had the knowledge and experience to guide Michele towards achieving her goals. “Johanna was terrific as a mentor,” raved Michele, “it was great that she was aware of what it was like getting back into the business.”

The second feature of the program that Michele found beneficial was the required monthly volunteer commitment. “Volunteering at Quest Outreach Society was something I might not have done otherwise, and I am very appreciative to the program for this opportunity. It gave the mentees an opportunity to get to know each other while giving back to the community. It felt like we were having a positive impact. “

Lastly, Michele landed an agent and succeeded in meeting her goal. She credited the program director, Krista Magnusson, for developing a program that focuses on meeting goals and individual growth. “Throughout the program, you are tasked with looking at where you are, where you want to be, and whether you are on track to getting there,” recounted Michele, “If the program was going to be effective, you, as a mentee had perform these tasks and answer these questions for yourself.” This was a valuable lesson that continues to guide her as she pursues her career.

Find out more about the WIFTV Actor Career Mentorship Program here.

 

Lindsay Peters Explains How The From Our Dark Side Winners Got To Pitch Their Projects At This Year’s Frontières Market

When this year’s From Our Dark Side Genre Concept Competition winners were announced, the five recipients knew that the accelerator program included a trip to the Frontières Co-Production Market in Montreal. What they did not know is that this year they would have the amazing opportunity to pitch their projects at the first ever Directed by Women pitch sessions at Frontières.

Frontières, organized by Fantasia International Film Festival, is a co-production market that provides a launch point for both established and emerging genre auteurs to get their films made through pitching opportunities and networking events. WIFTV had the pleasure of speaking with Lindsay Peters, the Market Director at Frontières, about how this unique opportunity came about and what she sees for future.

LPETERS

Lindsay Peters – Market Director at Frontières Market

WIFTV: How long have you been working with Frontières?

Lindsay: I have worked on Frontières since its beginning. It began in 2012 and I took over as director in 2014, so it has been for the last 3 years.

W: And this was the first year that Frontières had the Directed By Women pitch sessions?

L: We have had this really nice collaboration with Women in Film & Television Vancouver and the From Our Dark Side since its beginning, where part of the winner’s prize package was Frontières accreditation. For a while, we have been wanting to create a real official space for female-driven projects because we are still not receiving as many female directed projects in our general call as I would like to be seeing. So the idea for creating the Directed By Women sessions was to maybe provide some support for projects and filmmakers at an earlier stage than what we ask for in our main call for projects. For the Frontières Market, we ask that projects be in late development, early financing, and that they have a producer onboard and the script is more or less complete. The idea for Directed by Women came about as a half pitch session, half incubator for female filmmakers and screenwriters.    

W: In the last few years, many of the funding agencies such as Telefilm and the Canadian Media Fund, having committed to gender parity through a variety of measures. Did this play a role in the development of this Directed by Women program or has it always been an initiative to get more women in? I did notice that your team is mostly women.

L: We joke about that a lot actually, we are up to three [men on our team] this year and we felt very progressive about that [laughter]. But no, it is always something that has been a real priority for us. For our main selection process, we have not overtly set out to have more diversity in our lineup. We do just try to make sure that the best projects make it in, and two years ago it just so happened that we have a lot of female-driven projects and a lot of projects from visible minorities and that was completely by chance. Which was fantastic and people really noticed and responded to it. It wasn’t really something we advertised, it was just in our opening pitch sessions where people saw this and they started tweeting about it, it was great. But I realized it was really difficult to recreate that naturally. It has always been something that has been a big priority for us and it seems like good timing this year with Telefilms 50/50 initiative.

I also think that it is so early on that we haven’t quite seen exactly how they plan to accomplish that. There is still the question of whether the original problem with the lack of female-driven projects came from them not receiving enough submissions from women or whether they were not approving enough female-driven projects. That was the thinking for an earlier stage section, to help some of these women find the partners needed to get them to the telefilm financing stage.

18

Directed By Women Pitch Sessions at Frontières Market

W: Great! You mentioned the huge response to Directed by Women, who is this response coming from?

L: The people attending and the producers. I think that they liked that there was a change in format as to how the projects were pitched. It was a little more aligned with the early stages of the projects. Directed by Women were at the treatment or early draft script stage, and pitched by the director or screenwriter, and pretty much all of our pitchers were early on in their careers.   


W: Do you have a plan on how the Directed By Women will continue to grow at Frontières?

L: We would really like to have Directed by Women pitch sessions next year. It really went over so great. We had such a huge response to it. Our focus is small, I think having seven projects pitching this year was the right amount. At Frontières we aim to keep things a little bit intimate. We grow a little bit every year but we would really love to continue working with WIFTV and From Our Dark Side.

Words by Kaitlen Arundale

If you would like to learn more about From Our Dark Side, click here.