From rough cut to festival: How WIFTV and the Film & Media Showcase helped me finish a film

By Sandra Ignagni

Sandra Ignagni Picture-3Once a month Vancouver filmmakers gather at the Film & Media Showcase to watch a selection of short and feature-length films in a casual and supportive environment. Co-hosted by three artist-focused British Columbia organizations – Women in Film + Television Vancouver, Cineworks and DOC BC – the event offers filmmakers an opportunity to screen their work and discuss their creative process – both successes and challenges.

Last summer, WIFTV selected my short documentary One Step at a Time: A Story About Women and Shoes for screening at the showcase. The film, a portrait of four young women in Toronto and Vancouver who are embarking on unconventional careers in the traditionally male-dominated fields of cobbling and shoemaking, was decidedly in rough-cut stage. Continue reading

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Vampire Superstition in Eastern Europe – The Cursed Days at #VIWIFF2016

The Cursed Days_Nataša NinkovićDid you know that the word “vampir” (vampire) originated in Serbia? The vampire superstition started in the 18th century when, as legend has it, a villager was accused of killing nine people after his death. Continue reading

Genius In The Wild – Nell Shipman’s Story at #VIWIFF2016

Nell Shipman dog lake shot95 years ago, she drove dogsleds, pioneered the nude scene and insisted in the human treatment of her animals’ co-stars. She lost everything but heart. And then she vanished . . .  Continue reading

A Match Made in Mentorship Heaven – Writer Christina Sicoli reports from the Whistler Film Festival

Opening Gala at the Whistler Film Festival

The Whistler Conference Centre is buzzing with activity come festival time.

There were more talented people than her but they quit. Don’t quit. Go back to your craft, back to your voice, but don’t quit.”–Meg LeFauve (Variety’s 10 Screenwriters To Watch).

THE MORNING AFTER. A cup of coffee, an over-stimulated body and a blog entry. I’ve been staring at my computer not knowing where to begin. But as I’m learning with most beginnings, they constantly shift and give birth to newer ones. So I asked myself, “What began for me with this new experience”?  Continue reading

Journalist Heidi Honeycutt about women directing genre and programming the Etheria Film Night Showcase

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Etheria Film Night is an annual one-night showcase of the best new short genre films (horror, sci-fi, fantasy, action, comedy, thriller) directed by women. The festival’s goal is to connect industry professionals with untapped female directing talent for genre film and TV series. Continue reading

#VIWIFF2015 Award Winners

Pauline Egan with the Legacy Awards trophy

Pauline Egan with the Legacy Awards trophy

The 2015 Vancouver International Women in Film Festival is a wrap! It was a wonderful, five-day event filled with film screenings, workshops, parties and an award show.

Congratulations to all participating festival filmmakers for their magnificent work, many thanks to all sponsors, community partners, media partners, volunteers and organizers for the hard work and the social media shoutouts, which made all the difference!

The following awards were announced on Closing Night, March 8, at the Vancity Theatre. Continue reading

Movies to Watch with That Special Someone

Some say that rom-coms and dramas focused on love stories are the main reason we  go to the movies in the first place. If you’re looking for movies to watch on Date Night with your significant other, here are the best picks for a little romance.

As a side note, our judges and Festival Committee are especially pleased that this year’s line-up features several films which aren’t your “classic” boy-meets-girl stories–four of the seven films below have LGBTQ2S presences.

Continue reading

Fun Facts: Michelle Thrush

Canadian actor Michelle Thrush is the subject of the eponymous short documentary directed by Shannon Kaplun and narrated by Adam Beach. Thrush, one of the stars of APTN’s Blackstone and CBC’s Arctic Air series, is especially unique among the Canadian film and television industry. Here are a few funny and interesting facts about what was going on behind the camera for Kaplun, and about Thrush herself:

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  • Michelle lived ‘off the grid’ with her two children for 2 years. They had to grow, hunt and collect their food and water.  In the winter they had enough solar power to watch 1 DVD! They had no cellular reception – a talent agent’s nightmare.
  • Kaplun says the three biggest challenges of making this film (and others in the Catch the Dream bio series) were geography, power, and communication–she had to work with four different male producers from three different cities and time zones in two different countries!
  • Did you know that lamas are fiercely protective?  They are gentle with children but drive off wild cats – the crew worked with three of them when shooting Michelle’s main interview at wildcat ranch near Calgary. You can see them in the credits, which Kaplun considers an especially fun memory making this documentary.
  • Thrush’s big screen debut was alongside Johnny Depp in Deadman from 1995.

Don’t miss the short documentary Michelle Thrush Sunday, March 9th 1:00-3:30 pm.

#Daretotell why you are interested in watching this film to win prizes in our social media contest.